The Gandhi-Irwin Pact was a political agreement signed by Mahatma Gandhi and Lord Irwin, Viceroy of India, on 5 March 1931.

The Gandhi-Irwin Pact was a political agreement signed by Mahatma Gandhi and Lord Irwin, Viceroy of India, on 5 March 1931. It was signed before Second Round Table Conference in London.

In October 1929, Lord Irwin had announced an indefinite offer of dominion status to British-occupied India in an unspecified future and a Round Table Conference to discuss a future constitution.

Sarojini Naidu described Gandhi and Lord Irwin as “The Two Leaders” had eight meetings that added 24 hours. Sincerity of Irwin impressed Mahatma Gandhi.

Terms of Gandhi-Irwin Pact

In this agreement, Lord Irwin has accepted that –

Lord Irwin had announced an indefinite offer of dominion status to British-occupied India in an unspecified future and a Round Table Conference to discuss a future constitution.
Lord Irwin
  • Removal of all prosecutions relating to several types of offenses except those involving violence
  • Indians will be given the right to make salt along the coast.
  • Indians can picket in front of liquor and foreign clothing shops.
  • Those who resigned during the movement will be restored to their posts.
  • The property seized during the movement will be returned.

Gandhiji accepted the following terms from the Congress –

  • The civil disobedience movement will be suspended.
  • The Congress will join the Second Round Table Conference.
  • The Congress will not boycott British goods.
  • Gandhiji will give up the demand to investigate the excesses of the police.

View of Britishers on the Gandhi-Irwin Pact

Numerous British officials in India and Great Britain were offended by the ideo of a pact with a party whose main purpose was the destruction of British Raj.

Winston Churchill openly stated his objection "...at the nauseating and humiliating spectacle of this one-time Inner Temple lawyer, now seditious fakir, striding half-naked up the steps of the Viceroy’s palace, there to negotiate and parley on equal terms with the representative of the King Emperor."
Winston Churchil

Winston Churchill openly stated his objection “…at the nauseating and humiliating spectacle of this one-time Inner Temple lawyer, now seditious fakir, striding half-naked up the steps of the Viceroy’s palace, there to negotiate and parley on equal terms with the representative of the King Emperor.”

>>>Read About Poona Pact, 1932

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